School of Letters Department of Humanities Literature Course
English Linguistics & Literature Major
Major (Credit 2)
選択科目
Intended Year:
Intended School:
英語学演習 XII
English Linguistics (Seminar XII)
Sub Title  English in Intercultural Communication
外国人教師 Edmundo Cruz LUNA
Numbering Code: LET-HUM4567E
Course Code: 18053203
2018 SpringTerm
weekly Wed3
Ito 204 Classroom
E科目 (English, English)
Course Overview As the world increasingly relies on English as a de facto international lingua franca, many speakers assume that this would simplify most communicative burdens. However, sharing a common language is only one component in successful communication - speakers must also realize communicative differences that are due to differing cultural backgrounds and assumptions. This course will introduce students to the field of intercultural communication - and expose students to the benefits of looking at English communication through this perspective, as well as the consequences of avoiding this aspect. Students will have opportunities to collect and analyze data to see whether they notice differences in communicative styles.
Keywords : English, communicative styles, intercultural communication
Prerequisites :
Required Ability :
Course Plan Textbooks : Scollon, Ron, Scollon, Suzanne Wong, and Jones, Rodney H. 2012. Intercultural Communication: A Discourse Approach (3rd ed). West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
Reference Books : Other readings will be selected from the following:

Becker, Carl B. 1986. Reasons for the Lack of Argumentation and Debate in the Far East. International Journal of Intercultural Relations 10: 75-92.

Chun, Elaine W. 1991. The construction of white, black, and Korean American identities through African American vernacular English. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 11 (1): 52-64

Clancy, Patricia. 1985. “The Acquisition of Japanese”. In Dan Slobin (ed.), Crosslinguistic Studies of Language Acquisition, 373-524. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

House, Deborah. 2002. Language Shift among the Navajos: Identity, Politics, and Cultural Continuity. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Kochman, Thomas. 1981. “Classroom Modalities”. In Black and White: Styles in Conflict, 16-73. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Kroskrity, Paul and Field, Margaret. 2009. Native American Language Ideologies: Language Beliefs, Practices, and Struggles in Indian Country. Tuscon, AZ: University of Arizona Press.

Morgan, Marcyliena. 1998. “More Than A Mood or An Attitude: Discourse and Verbal Genres in African American Culture”. In Salikoko Mufwene, John Rickford, Guy Bailey, John Baugh (eds.), African American English: Structure, History and Usage, 251-281. London: Routledge.

Park, Joseph Sung Yul. 2004. “‘Baby, darling, honey!’: Constructing a competence of English in South Korean TV shows.” In Wai Fong Chiang, Elaine Chun, Laura Mahalingappa, and Siri Mehus (eds.), Texas Linguistic Forum Vol. 47, pp.143-154. Austin: Texas Linguistic Forum.
Course Handouts : Handouts will be made available in a dedicated Dropbox folder.

Tentative Weekly Schedules Lecture Exercise, Field trip etc. Comments, suggestions for the course preparation, review, etc.
1 Introduction: What is "intercultural communication"? Why is understanding this necessary? What is a "communicative style"?
2 What can "intercultural communication" tell us?
Examples of "cross-talk" - what is it, and why is this detrimental to successful communication?
3 Communicative Styles in the African-American community: Signifying, Indirection, Verbal flexibility
4 Communicative Styles in the African-American community 2: Rapping, Boasting, Playing the dozens (AKA snaps, AKA 'yo momma' jokes)
5 How do differing communicative expectations come to a head in the mainstream (Anglo-Saxon) American classroom?
6 A study in contrasts: Communicative styles in Native American communities
7 How do Native American communicative styles translate in the classroom?
8 Midterm Exam
9 Communicative styles of various Asian-American communities: the apparent lack of debate in East Asian communities
10 Communicative styles amongst East Asian-American communities (with special focus on Japanese-American communities).
11 Asian-American communicative styles 2 - what happens in Southeast Asian-American communities? A personal perspective
12 What happens in South Asian-American communities? (And why Asian-American *cannot* be a monolithic label)
13 Possible intercultural communication conflicts - an extreme case: The Los Angeles riots of April 1992
14 Stereotyping of various cultural communicative styles in mainstream media: why this should be addressed
15 Final Data Presentations Final Paper deadline: TBD

Suggestion for success (Specific) : Please let me know if you are having difficulties comprehending the material - I am free to talk whenever I am in my office. I can also make appointments via email.
Study Consultation (Office Hours) :
Course Objectives
かなり優れている 優れている 及第である 一層の努力が必要
B_B1-c [外国語運用能力]
Students must be able to recognize different uses of English - as they are used by speakers of widely different cultural backgrounds.
EXCELLENT LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class preparation and degree of completing evaluations and assignments, can be evaluated as "outstanding." GOOD LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class preparation and degree of completing evaluations and assignments, can be evaluated as "good." AVERAGE/SATISFACTORY LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class preparation and degree of completing evaluations and assignments, can be evaluated as "satisfactory." DEFICIENT: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class preparation and degree of completing evaluations and assignments, fall below average. More effort and application are required to pass.
B_B1-f [批判的討論]
Students must be able to critically think about and discuss certain linguistic phenomena as they apply to intercultural communication in English.
EXCELLENT LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class preparation and degree of completing evaluations and assignments, can be evaluated as "outstanding." GOOD LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class preparation and degree of completing evaluations and assignments, can be evaluated as "good." AVERAGE/SATISFACTORY LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class preparation and degree of completing evaluations and assignments, can be evaluated as "satisfactory." DEFICIENT: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class preparation and degree of completing evaluations and assignments, fall below average. More effort and application are required to pass.
GPA Evaluation
A B C D F
授業を通じて、総じて「かなり優れている」に相当する活動を行った。 授業を通じて、概ね「優れている」を超える活動を行った。 授業を通じて、「及第する」に相当する活動を行った。 授業を通じて、総じて「及第する」には達しないものの、それに近い活動を行った。 授業を通じて、「一層の努力が必要」の活動にとどまった。
Evaluation
Standpoint→
Evaluation Method
B_B1-c
[外国語運用能力]
B_B1-f
[批判的討論]
Grading Percentage, Disqualification etc.
Class tests 25%
Presentation 35%
Report 40%

Additional Information regarding Evaluation Method : Midterm Exam: 25%
Data Presentation: 35%
Final Paper with Data Analysis: 40%
Others Others :

教職 :
資格 :

: 2018/3/9 (08:24)