Graduate School of Humanities Department of Languages and Literature Western Literature Field
English Linguistics & Literature Speciality
(Credit 2)
選択科目
Intended Year:
Intended School:
英語学特殊研究 IV
English Linguistics Special Studies (Seminar IV)
Sub Title  Language and Culture Redux: A Discussion of Dialogicality and Other Issues
外国人教師 Edmundo Cruz LUNA
Numbering Code:
Course Code:
2019 FallTerm
weekly Thu3
Ito B-106 Classroom
E科目 (English, English)
Course Overview This course is designed to have graduate-level students discuss and explore ways that language interacts with the basic idea of culture. What is culture? How and why is culture so intertwined with language? We will discuss topics such as linguistic relativity, language and identity, and specific cross-linguistic cases where culture strongly determines linguistic choices. We will also discuss the notion of dialogicality and how that manifests itself in language.
Keywords : Language, culture, linguistic relativity, indexing, deixis, dialogicality
Prerequisites :
Required Ability :
Course Plan Textbooks :
Reference Books : Basso, Keith H. 1996. Wisdom sits in places: landscape and language among the Western Apache. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.

Becker, Alton. 1995. Beyond translation: essays toward a modern philology. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Bowerman, Melissa. 1996. The origins of children's spatial semantic categories: cognitive versus linguistic determinants. In John J. Gumperz and Stephen C. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking linguistic relativity, 145-176. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Du Bois, John W. 1992. Meaning without intention: lessons from divination. In Jane H. Hill and Judith T. Irvine (eds.), Responsibility and evidence in oral discourse, 48-71. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Du Bois, John W. 2014. Towards a dialogic syntax. Cognitive Linguistics 25(3): 359–410.

Haviland, John B. 1996. Projections, transpositions, and relativity. In John J. Gumperz and Stephen C. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking linguistic relativity, 271-323. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jakobson, Roman. 1990 [1957]. Shifters and verbal categories. In Linda Waugh and Monique Monville-Burston (eds.), On language, 386-392. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Laury, Ritva. 2012. Taking a stance and getting on with it: the form and function of the Finnish finite clausal extraposition construction. Text & Talk 4(7), 503-524.
Pinker, Steven. 1994. The language instinct: how the mind creates language. New York: William Morrow and Co.

Silverstein, Michael. 1995 [1985]. Shifters, linguistic categories and cultural description. In Ben G. Blount (ed.), Language, culture, and society: a book of readings, 2nd ed., 187-221. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press, Inc.

Slobin, Dan I. 1996. Thinking for speaking. In John J. Gumperz and Stephen C. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking linguistic relativity, 271-323. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Tomasello, Michael. 1999. The human adaptation for culture. Annual review of anthropology 1999 (28): 509-529.

Whorf, Benjamin Lee. 1995 [1941]. The relation of habitual thought and behavior to language. In Ben G. Blount (ed.), Language, culture, and society: a book of readings, 2nd ed., 64-84. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press, Inc.
Course Handouts :

Tentative Weekly Schedules Lecture Exercise, Field trip etc. Comments, suggestions for the course preparation, review, etc.
1 Introduction – what is culture? Why is it important when talking about language? Bring in something and be prepared to discuss how that thing relates to culture.
2 Linguistic relativity: the beginning with Lee and Whorf Whorf 1995 [1941]
3 Arguments against the (too) strong version of the Lee-Whorf hypothesis Pinker 1994
4 “Thinking for Speaking” – Whorfism redux? Slobin 1996
5 Examples of how (the weak version) of Whorfism can manifest itself Bowerman 1996
6 What is linguistic indexicality – and how do languages deal with indexical shifting? Jakobson 1990 [1957]; Silverstein 1995 [1985]
7 Projections and laminations Haviland 1996
8 Midterm Presentations
9 How did humans come to acquire “culture”? Examining the "ratcheting effect" in culture Tomasello 1999
10 How do naming practices reinforce important ideas within a culture? Basso 1984
11 The importance meaning without “intention” Du Bois 1992
12 The issue of "prior text" Becker 1995
13 Dialogicality as a concept 1 Du Bois 2014
14 Dialogicality as a concept 2 - dialogicality and stance Laury 2012
15 Conclusions - Final Review

Suggestion for success (Specific) : Please let me know if you are having difficulties comprehending the material - I am free to talk whenever I am in my office. I can also make appointments via email.
Study Consultation (Office Hours) :
Course Objectives
かなり優れている 優れている 及第である 一層の努力が必要
ML_A-a [言語データの分析]
Students will have plenty of opportunities to explore English (or Japanese) data of his/her choice and analyze it with some aspect of language and culture discussed in class.
EXCELLENT LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "outstanding." GOOD LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "good." AVERAGE/SATISFACTORY LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "satisfactory." DEFICIENT: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, falls below average. More effort and application are required to pass.
ML_B2-a [総合把握力]
Students will get a chance to read some fundamental texts of language and culture, and then apply their key concepts in their data analyses.
EXCELLENT LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "outstanding." GOOD LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "good." AVERAGE/SATISFACTORY LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "satisfactory." DEFICIENT: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, falls below average. More effort and application are required to pass.
DL_A-a [言語データの分析]
Students will have plenty of opportunities to explore English (or Japanese) data of his/her choice and analyze it with some aspect of language and culture discussed in class.
EXCELLENT LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "outstanding." GOOD LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "good." AVERAGE/SATISFACTORY LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "satisfactory." DEFICIENT: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, falls below average. More effort and application are required to pass.
DL_B2-a [総合把握力]
Students will get a chance to read some fundamental texts of language and culture, and then apply their key concepts in their data analyses.
EXCELLENT LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "outstanding." GOOD LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "good." AVERAGE/SATISFACTORY LEVEL: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, can be evaluated as "satisfactory." DEFICIENT: Student achievement in this area, as measured through his/her level of class discussions and contributions in English, falls below average. More effort and application are required to pass.
GPA Evaluation
A B C D F
授業を通じて、総じて「かなり優れている」に相当する活動を行った。 授業を通じて、概ね「優れている」を超える活動を行った。 授業を通じて、「及第する」に相当する活動を行った。 授業を通じて、総じて「及第する」には達しないものの、それに近い活動を行った。 授業を通じて、「一層の努力が必要」の活動にとどまった。
Evaluation
Standpoint→
Evaluation Method
ML_A-a
[言語データの分析]
ML_B2-a
[総合把握力]
DL_A-a
[言語データの分析]
DL_B2-a
[総合把握力]
Grading Percentage, Disqualification etc.
Presentation Midterm Presentation: 40%
Final Exam Final Exam: 50%
Attendance Attendance: 10%

Additional Information regarding Evaluation Method : Midterm data presentation: 40%
Final exam: 50%
Attendance: 10%
Others Others :

教職 : 教職(英語)
資格 :

: 2019/6/27 (12:52)